HOW TO GET A LUNCH

Getting a business lunch or meeting circles back to answering the same basic question, “What are you offering the other person that they want or need?”

Different people in different positions in different stages of their lives and careers have different wants and needs. So there is no one-size-fits-all solution.

With that said here are a few pointers:

1. TREAT THE MEETING AS A FOLLOW-UP.

Find ways to first meet the person in a different situation. Engage with someone at a film festival or screening. Really engage to the degree the other person wishes they could spend more time with you. Then offer to give them that time.

2. GET A REAL RECOMMENDATION.

Find a mutual person who is legitimately passionate about you and can articulate to the person you want to meet why your mutual friend would be doing them a favor in getting to know you. Have them articulate what problem you can solve for them.

3. HAVE SOMETHING TANGIBLE TO PITCH THAT THE OTHER PERSON WOULD TRUELY WANT OR NEED.

It could be a new recording facility or musicians group. It could be a fresh approach to a mock-up service or music editing or music prep. It could be a new approach to music supervision or clearances.

Find out what isn’t currently working for that other person (frequently it is cost) and offer a solution interesting enough to want to meet with you to hear about it.

4. GET KNOWN.

People are more interested in meeting people they have read or heard about.

Create seminars, do podcasts, write articles, give lectures, do panels, give interviews. Get your name out there.

You don’t have to (and won’t) start with a profile in the New York Times. Just start getting your name out there at any level.

I didn’t know or care that there was a Kubilay Uner or Ghiya Rushidat until they started posting interesting stuff on this Forum.

Lurkers lurk. Doers do.

Want to be heard? Then SPEAK.

5. PRACTICE

Taking good meetings is a skill. And just like mastering any skill it takes LOTS or repetition and practice.

Go through your contacts and reach out to tons of them to get together and meet.

Long lost friends, that guy you met once, that women who had that new idea, that person you don’t care for too much, that older person, that young upstart, that awkward person, that smooth operator.

Create reasons to meet knowing that the primary purpose for you is to improve your meeting game.

A person who has meetings two or three times a week is going to get better at it than someone who practices less regularly.

6. MOMENTUM

It is hard to explain, but energy builds energy. A person taking lots of meetings ends up getting lots of meetings. The whole “meeting” energy builds upon itself.

10 seemingly worthless meetings can lead to one spectacular one.

That could be because one of those 10 meetings turns out to be a gem or because one of them leads to a recommendation of someone great or because your whole vibe starts attracting more meetings.

7. IF YOU WANT SOMETHING, GIVE IT

Who can you reach out to right now that would really appreciate meeting with you? Who could you help? Who can you support? Who can you go out of your way to lend a hand?

Who can you treat to lunch without you wanting anything in return?

8. EMBRACE REJECTION

If you can put yourself out there 100 times trying to get a meeting and yield one, BRAVO! You got a meeting! Those 99 other rejects were merely your path to get to the one you got.

It’s all a numbers game. Develop a think skin and keep plugging away.

9. AIM LOWER AND WIDER

There are THOUSANDS of people worth meeting, not just the famous and well-established ones.

A person working on their first projects is more likely to be intrigued in meeting. And they could be the very person who makes all the difference in your life.

Stop judging. That person you could be meeting may not be Steven Spielberg, but, let’s be honest, you ain’t John Williams.

Dig. It is far easier to rattle off the names of the top people in the industry. How about everyone else? There is a whole iceberg of people worth knowing past the tip.

10. VALUE THE OTHER PERSON’S TIME

Prepare. Do research about the person you are meeting. Read about them. Watch their prior works.

Bring your A game to the meeting. Be interesting and interested. Be engaging and a great listener.

Be memorable. Most people in the industry take TONS of meetings. They can’t recall the majority of them. Distinguish yourself.

End the meeting with that other person craving a follow up.

WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM OTHERS ABOUT THEIR EXPERIENCES IN GETTING MEETINGS