HOW I DECIDED TO BE A TALENT AGENT AND NOT A TALENT SCOUT.

It is important to identify what you enjoy and are good at when pursuing a career.

For me, I excel in focusing on taking newly emerging or underutilized mature talent and parlaying their initial successes into greater and long-sustaining careers.

To achieve this, I put my time into running a boutique agency with a focus on tracking a relatively narrow range of projects, ones that I feel are worth pursuing for clients who are already fairly established with known projects and accomplishments.

All of this works because I understand my own strengths and interests and have shaped a business around them.

KNOWING YOUR WEAKNESSES AND YOUR CORE BUSINESS.

I know I am not a very good talent scout nor am I in that profession. I am not seeking out unproven, raw talent unattached to known accomplishments.

I decided a long time ago not to work on the vast field of smaller, entry level projects, that a beginning composer typically needs to cut his/her teeth upon. I usually don’t have relationships with those beginning filmmakers. This isn’t my focus nor my strength. And, therefore, I don’t run a business designed to service that.

HELPING BEYOND WORK

Since I also care about helping composer beyond those I represent, including those starting out of the gate, I have also dedicated time away from my business to share information on this Forum and elsewhere. I hope it is helpful.

THE TALENT SCOUT

It takes a very different focus, time commitment, expertise and business plan to mine raw talent, discover unseen gems, and to then sell them to the sort of initial, entry level jobs typically required to start a career in media music.

Being that sort of ground floor talent scout takes a very special person. I imagine it would require a lot of hard work, digging, polishing and pavement pounding to pull off.

GRADUATING TO THE MAJOR LEAGUES

Being an early believer and investor into a new composer potentially also involves a lot of heartache.

An inherent challenge of being a talent scout is that the very clients who succeed with you are the most likely to graduate and move over to bigger talent agents.

It isn’t because those composers are ungrateful jerks.

It is because, as a career grows, there are new and greater demands, decisions and opportunities to navigate. That is why composers often leave their early reps to work with people with more experience and expertise in managing higher level, successful careers.

YOU CANT EXCEL AT EVERYTHING

Trying to be too many things to too many people is usually a recipe for disaster.

Knowing what you want to pursue and devoting yourself towards that plan (while still remaining open and somewhat flexible) is likely to yield the most satisfying results.